• Waights Taylor, Jr. to hold book signing in Livingston

    Posted: March 23, 2012

    Author: Gena Robbins

    Birmingham native Waights Taylor Jr. will hold a book signing for his new publication, “Our Southern Home:Scottsboro to Montgomery to Birmingham–The Transformation of the South in the Twentieth Century,” tonight, Monday April 9, at the Callaway Schoolhouse on the University of West Alabama campus at 6 p.m.

    The book, named after the Sumter County weekly newspaper publication “Our Southern Home,” of which Waights’ father was editor and publisher, weaves together the story of his family with those of Rosa Parks, Clarence Norris, and the wrenching transformations that defined the South in the twentieth century.

    Taylor stated that he looks forward to his Livingston homecoming, where according to him, like Jem in “To Kill a Mockingbird,” he experienced a joyful youth tempered by the hateful trappings of racism and segregation that a boy of 14 did not fully comprehend.

    “I lived in Livingston and Sumter County for almost fours years, 1949-1952, from the ages of 11 to 14," said Taylor. During those years, my mother and father, Waights Taylor Sr. and Rose Taylor, were the editors of "Our Southern Home," the county’s weekly newspaper. I was introduced to the river, and the fields and streams, our youthful playground, by two young black boys named Willie Jr. and Yank. I leaned much from them about the outdoors, but also learned about the social and economic injustice they suffered during those times. The memories of those days hung heavy in my heart for years, and, in part, led me to write my book."

    The event is sponsored by the Center for the Study of the Black Belt in UWA's Division of Educational Outreach. For more information, please contact Valerie Burnes at vburnes@uwa.edu or call (205) 652-3829.Birmingham native Waights Taylor Jr., will hold a book signing for his new publication, “Our Southern Home: Scottsboro to Montgomery to Birmingham–The Transformation of the South in the Twentieth Century,” on Monday, April 9 at the Callaway Schoolhouse on the University of West Alabama Campus.

    The book, named after the Sumter County, Ala. weekly newspaper publication “Our Southern Home,” of which Waights’ father was publisher and editor, weaves together the story of his family with those of Rosa Parks, Clarence Norris, and the wrenching transformations that defined the South in the twentieth century.

    The event is free to the public and is sponsored by the Center for the Study of the Black Belt in UWA’s Division of Educational Outreach. For more information, please contact Valerie Burnes at vburnes@uwa.edu or call (205) 652-3829.
     
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